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Name of Work

Dvořák, Antonín (1841-1904)

Antonín Dvořák (September 8, 1841 – May 1, 1904) is considered a great composer and orchestrator who integrated his native Czech (and pan-Slavic) folk music and culture western European art music of the time. Dvořák struggled through his youth between two loves: the newer contemporary musical ideas arising from the New German School (a progressive musical thought championed by Berlioz, Liszt, and Wagner, encompassing innovations in harmonic language, organic and cyclical compositions, and new music genres like the programmatic symphony and tone poem) and traditional Czech music.

In this biographical abstract, the word Czech is used to describe the area in and surrounding Bohemia, which is located in the western portion of the modern-day Czech Republic. Earlier in his career Dvořák mainly incorporated Czech folk elements into his music, but in his later years, he incorporated folk characteristics from many of the Slavic countries into his music, elevating the music of a people related through common folk characteristics and practices. In an interview in London in 1885, Dvořák stated:

“Every child in Bohemia must study music. The law enacting this is old; it was once repealed, but it is now in force again. Herein, I consider, lies one great secret of the natural talent for music in my country. Our national tunes and chorals come, as it were, from the very heart of the people, and beautiful things they are. […] The Slavs all love music. They may work all day in the fields, but they are always singing, and the true musical spirit burns bright within them.”

Because of the number of compositions Dvořák wrote and the confusion surrounding the order and numbering of his opuses, Jarmil Burghauser (1921-1997), a Czech composer, conductor, and musicologist, sorted, researched, and numbered each of Dvořák’s compositions in chronological order. Dvořák’s works were given what is now called Burghauser numbers (a letter B and the composition number in the order it was composed).

Dvořák wrote roughly 53 chamber works as well as nine symphonies, 15 operas, nine solo works with orchestra, 38 orchestral works, 34 keyboard works, nine choral works, and various cantatas, masses, oratories, songs, duets, and arrangements. To learn more, please read the following biography, which focuses on Dvořák’s chamber works and his influence on and contributions to the art form.

Click here to read an extended bio

Works:
Audio_on Piano Quintet in A Major, Op. 81 (2001)
Audio_on String Quartet in F Major, Op. 96
Audio_on String Quintet in G Major, Op. 77 (2004)
Audio_on String Quartet No. 11 in C Major, Op. 61 (2004)
Audio_on Piano Trio No. 4 in E minor, Op. 90, Dumky (2004)
Audio_on Terzetto in C Major, Op. 74, for two violins and viola
Audio_on Serenade for winds and strings in D Minor, Op. 44 (2007)
Audio_on Piano Quintet in A Major, Op. 81 (2008)
Audio_on Three Slavonic Dances
Audio_on Trio in F minor, Op. 65 for piano, violin and cello
Audio_on Viola Quintet in E-flat Major, Op. 97, American
Audio_on Serenade for winds and strings in D Minor, Op. 44 (2000)
Audio_on Bagatelles, Op. 47 for two violins, cello and harmonium (2010)
Audio_on String Sextet in A, Op. 48 (1998)
Audio_on Piano Trio No. 4 in E minor, Op. 90, Dumky (1997)
Audio_on String Quartet No. 11 in C major, Op. 61 (1997)
Audio_on Piano Quintet in A Major, Op. 81 (1996)
Audio_on Quintet for Strings in G Major, Op. 77 (1995)
Audio_on Two Waltzes for String Quartet Op. 54, Nos. 1, 4
Audio_on Serenade for winds and strings in d minor, Op. 44 (1992)
Audio_on Bagatelles, Op. 47 for two violins, cello and harmonium (1990)
Audio_on Piano Trio No. 4 in E minor, Op. 90, Dumky (1990)
Audio_on Piano Quintet in A Major, Op. 81 (1989)
Audio_on Piano Quartet No. 2 in E-flat Major, Op. 87